The Lost Tools of Learning: Symposium on Education by Dorothy L. Sayers

The Lost Tools of Learning: Symposium on Education

Book Title: The Lost Tools of Learning: Symposium on Education

Publisher: Independently published

ISBN: 1520144776

Author: Dorothy L. Sayers


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Dorothy L. Sayers with The Lost Tools of Learning: Symposium on Education

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Another incredible title from Dorothy L Sayers to consider is The Mind of the Maker. Published by CrossReach Publications: https://amazon.com/dp/1520215185

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That I, whose experience of teaching is extremely limited, should presume to discuss education is a matter, surely, that calls for no apology. It is a kind of behavior to which the present climate of opinion is wholly favorable. Bishops air their opinions about economics; biologists, about metaphysics; inorganic chemists, about theology; the most irrelevant people are appointed to highly technical ministries; and plain, blunt men write to the papers to say that Epstein and Picasso do not know how to draw. Up to a certain point, and provided that the criticisms are made with a reasonable modesty, these activities are commendable. Too much specialization is not a good thing. There is also one excellent reason why the veriest amateur may feel entitled to have an opinion about education. For if we are not all professional teachers, we have all, at some time or other, been taught. Even if we learnt nothing, perhaps in particular if we learnt nothing, our contribution to the discussion may have a potential value.